Saturday, 30 April 2011

Verbal Diarrhoea #3

SPOILER ALERT for 3D Sex and Zen: Extreme Ecstasy
Do not read further for details of Vonnie Lui's character


"So now whenever I see Lui's pictures, I will unintentionally think of her speaking with a man's voice, and exploding into pieces. This has a great psychological impact on me."
Claims Anonymous via movie actor Chapman To Man-chak on YouTube

About Verbal Diarrhoea




Reference

Excerpts from Criticism of '3D Sex and Zen' spawns YouTube hit (SCMP; paywall)
Ada Lee
Apr 27, 2011

A letter criticising the soft porn film 3D Sex and Zen: Extreme Ecstasy as too violent and not sexy enough has gone viral, attracting more than 1.1 million views on YouTube, thanks to movie star Chapman To Man-chak.

The criticism was originally posted by an anonymous writer on an internet forum. But it quickly gained notoriety after To recorded himself reading from the 1,000-word letter. The recording was uploaded on YouTube a week ago.

To then apologised to the hit movie's executive producer, Stephen Shiu Yeuk-yuen, on Chinese networking site Weibo, saying the recording was a reckless act which might have offended some people.

The unnamed letter writer apparently voiced what has dissatisfied many movie viewers, despite the film's popularity.

"Why is the 3-D part in a 3-D porn [movie] nothing to do with sex? It's more about bullets, flying knives, rocks, blood, organs. If I wanted to see flying bullets, I would rather watch [action-comedy movie] Let the Bullets Fly. It's really scary. I curled up when I watched it."

The writer also complained about how actress Vonnie Lui Hoi-yan, who plays a hermaphrodite in the 3-D film, was blown to pieces in the end.

"So now whenever I see Lui's pictures, I will unintentionally think of her speaking with a man's voice, and exploding into pieces. This has a great psychological impact on me."

Friday, 29 April 2011

0824 HKSAR Name of the Day

Dickson Poon Dik-sang, group executive chairman, Dickson Concepts, Hong Kong


About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation; Phonetic-based; Son-suffix

Wednesday, 27 April 2011

0823 HKSAR Name of the Day

Payson Cha Mou-sing, businessman (family owns Asia Television), Hong Kong


About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation; Son-suffix; Substitution

Monday, 25 April 2011

0822 HKSAR Name of the Day

Meyrick Chow (Mr), clinical associate, School of Nursing, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong


About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Sunday, 24 April 2011

0821 HKSAR Name of the Day

Venice Wong Yam-Yu, student, School of Communications, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong


About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare; Geography-based

Saturday, 23 April 2011

Easter Droppings

Don't worry, apparently they are all fine!


Real Madrid player Sergio Ramos drops Spanish cup under a bus
Trophy takes a tumble and disappears under vehicle's wheels as footballers celebrate victory over arch-rivals Barcelona

Medics drop cruise ship passenger into North Sea
Woman, 73, who had been taken ill spends eight minutes in water after transfer by Norwegian rescue services

Briton catches toddler who fell from fourth-floor balcony
A toddler who fell from the fourth-floor balcony of a Florida hotel was caught by a British tourist in the pool area below


While we are on the topic, why not drop the religious aspects of Easter altogether? Let's celebrate Earth Day and Springtime and have fun too! Lions and Pandas and Bears, oh my!!
Google Doodle Earth Day 22 April 2011


Related Posts
Easter is a Fairy Tale

Earth Hour's False Dilemma

0820 HKSAR Name of the Day

Kalina Wu (Ms), lecturer, School of Nursing, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong


About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Friday, 22 April 2011

0819 HKSAR Name of the Day

Phila Siu Chi-Yui (Mr), student, School of Communications, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong


About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation; Insertion

Thursday, 21 April 2011

Verbal Diarrhoea #2

All over the world, except India, people love bland, less spicy food. But Indian people are less concerned about nutrition. They first focus on the spice of the food, the taste.
Claims Himank Doshi, a medical student who believes all non-Indians like the same things
Indian spices (pic from here)


The popularity of Indian cuisine outside of India, and targeted not just for Indian people, rather puts this medical student to shame (he or she has spouted VD).

The spread of VD is an unfortunate consequence of poor education and poor critical thinking and downright stupidity. Therefore from time to time, this site will post examples of VD in the hope that others may laugh, lament and learn from other people’s mistakes.

For example, Verbal Diarrhoea #1



Reference

Excerpts from Childhood obesity, diabetes plague India
Agence France-Presse in Mumbai
Apr 19, 2011

Indian housewife Sujata Budarapu was shocked when she was told that her two sons were on the verge of developing Type 2 diabetes.

"It had never even occurred to me that this could happen. I had heard that outside India this happens to other people's kids but I never thought it would happen to my own," said the 38-year-old from Mumbai.

Her children are not exceptional cases, even in a country more traditionally associated with malnourishment and chronic food shortages than overeating and weight-related illness.

India still struggles to feed all of its 1.2 billion population but childhood obesity and diabetes have become an increasing problem among the middle classes, who have largely benefited from a decade of rapid economic growth. "Childhood obesity has definitely increased in the last couple of years," said Dr Paula Goel, from the Fayth Clinic in Mumbai, which runs a weight-loss programme for adolescents. "This is mainly because ... they're not playing in the fields and they're spending so much time on sedentary activities that come with the affluent lifestyle. Visiting the malls over the weekends, eating junk food, it's bound to cause obesity."

At 12 years old, Budarapu's youngest son, Saiprasad, watches three hours of television every day and weighs 66 kilograms when he should be between 52kg and 58kg.

Her eldest boy, Sairaj, 15, tips the scales at 89kg - more than 30kg overweight.

Both boys love eating oil-rich and fast food and are on medication to control their sugar levels. They have been attending Goel's clinic for the past three months.

Anoop Misra, president of the Centre for Diabetes, Obesity and Cholesterol Disorders in New Delhi, says India has the highest number of diabetics in the world at just under 51 million.

But that number could increase by nearly 150 per cent in the next 20 years, he warned.

The high number of cases among South Asian people has been attributed to genetic factors, including a predisposition to storing more fat.

Socio-environmental factors, though, are now seen as playing an increasing role in the rising number of cases of Type 2 diabetes.

The condition, which occurs when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it makes, largely as a result of excess body weight and physical inactivity, was previously seen mainly in older people.

"All over the world, except India, people love bland, less spicy food," said Himank Doshi, a medical student. "But Indian people are less concerned about nutrition. They first focus on the spice of the food, the taste."

That mindset, plus a decline in physical activity because of increased car use and a lack of open spaces in which to exercise, is a dangerous combination. A study of 4,000 Indian children in 15 cities published in August last year indicated that 23 per cent of five to 14-year-olds in urban schools were overweight, while nearly 11 per cent were obese.


0818 HKSAR Name of the Day

Sonny Tse Hing-min (Mr), lecturer, School of Nursing, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong


About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Wednesday, 20 April 2011

0817 HKSAR Name of the Day

Mav Li Yip-Tung, student, School of Communications, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong


About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation; Substitution

Tuesday, 19 April 2011

Professors Sprout Mumbo Jumbo

Whether Fung Shui is good or bad depends on the natural levels of iron in an individual's blood and the way they combine with magnetic fields.
Claims Professor Patrick Lau Sau-shing, who represents the architectural sector in the Legislative Council of the HKSAR Government

The chief executive's house behind the offices represents the "brain of the dragon", which is Hong Kong. So to place a large office block in front of Government House would be to block the flow of water - which represents money - into Hong Kong.
Claims assistant professor of architecture and fung shui disciple Michael Chiang Hong-man


Fung Shui (or Feng Shui) is one of Hong Kong's best-known Hocus Pocus scams. Just look at Tony Chan ... and this even without his ultimate scam in trying to hoodwink judges into getting his hands on the late Nina Wang's billions. Even supposedly smart and intelligent people are suckered brainwashed into believing in it.


We are intelligent conmen, academics even, and we believe in dragons. Pic by Felix Wong.


Excerpts from Blocking Government House a fung shui no-no (SCMP; paywall)
Chris Ip
Apr 16, 2011

The redevelopment of the Central Government Offices in Central has been criticised on a host of grounds linked to the environment, preservation and unnecessary waste.

The latest reason put forward by concern groups? Poor fung shui.

Qualified architect and fung shui disciple Michael Chiang Hong-man said that water - which represents money - comes in from the north. The chief executive's house behind the offices represents the "brain of the dragon", which is Hong Kong. So to place a large office block in front of Government House would be to block the flow of money into Hong Kong.

"Right now the government has obvious problems even with so much money," Chiang said. "What are they going to do if they have no money?"

But Abraham Razack, the lawmaker representing the real estate and construction industry, said although there were good reasons to preserve the site, fung shui was not one of them.

"Whether it's built or not should not be based on fung shui," he said, chuckling. "But we live in a society that's superstitious."

The government plans to pull down the 52-year-old West Wing of the current Central Government Offices after staff relocate to the Tamar site. In its place will be a 32-storey commercial block with 23,000 square metres of floor space and an underground mall, owned privately.

The Government Hill Concern Group, a collection of 20 advocacy associations, says the buildings are structurally sound and part of Hong Kong's history.

"At the moment no architect can predict whether once you build a beautiful house and live there you'll be prosperous and happy forever," he said. But according to Chiang, fung shui has been developed over hundreds of years and is an "environmental science".

Chiang is a member of the Royal Australian Institute of Architects and Royal Institute of British Architects, a class-one registered architect in China and an assistant professor of architecture at the University of Hong Kong.

Chiang also said the 32-storey block replacing the West Wing combined with the 10-storey East Wing block would create an imbalance. In fung shui, they represent a protective "green dragon" and "white tiger" respectively and in practical terms they create a buffer from typhoons.

Architect Lee Yuet, who is not a fung shui expert, agreed. "You are immediately making an imbalanced thing," he said. "From simple common sense, it's no good."

But setting up an office building might not be all bad vibes. The design of the building would open up more space in between the current East and West Wings, said Professor Patrick Lau Sau-shing, who represents the architectural sector in the Legislative Council. In fung shui terms that would mean opening up Government House to the north, leading to better chi.

However, Lau said that it all depended on the person living in Government House - Chief Executive Donald Tsang Yam-kuen. Whether the fung shui was good or bad depended on the natural levels of iron in an individual's blood and the way they combined with magnetic fields.

"But I'm not an expert," he added.

0816 HKSAR Name of the Day

Enid W. Y. Kwong (Dr), lecturer, School of Nursing, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong


About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Monday, 18 April 2011

0815 HKSAR Name of the Day

Sybilla Kot Hiu-Chuen, student, School of Communications, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong


About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Sunday, 17 April 2011

0814 HKSAR Name of the Day

Weety Luk (Dr), assistant professor, School of Nursing, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong


About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation

Saturday, 16 April 2011

0813 HKSAR Name of the Day

Samson Lee Kwok-Kin, student, School of Communications, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong

see 0369 HKSAR Name of the Day and 0396 HKSAR Name of the Day


About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare; Self-important; Son-suffix; somewhat common in Hong Kong

Friday, 15 April 2011

0812 HKSAR Name of the Day

July Lam (Ms), executive assistant, Department Of Rehabilitation Sciences, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong

see 0623 HKASR Name of the Day


About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Thursday, 14 April 2011

I Can't Hear Clearly Now

A friend commented on my recent post that linked to Tracy Chapman, saying that she thought the singer was a man. She had never heard of Tracy Chapman, and on first listen thought it was a man singing the song.

This is an interesting peculiar phenomenon. It is similar to how the same song can mean different things to different people in different situations and in different times (as mentioned here). Just different perceptions.

This time it is about perceptions of the singing voice without any reference to visual cues. I experienced this interesting peculiar phenomenon when I first heard the excellent song I Can See Clearly Now by Johnny Nash on the radio. I thought it was a female singer. In fact, IMHO the song I Can See Clearly Now sounds like it should fittingly be sung with a female voice.

Just click on the YouTube video below and close your eyes. Is Johnny Nash's voice feminine?



However, the funny thing is I (a man) do not perceive Tracy Chapman to have a male voice, and my friend (a woman) does not perceive Johnny Nash to have a female voice (and vice-versa ... if you get my drift!). Perhaps some people are biased toward perceiving male-sounding voices, and others toward female-sounding voices, while others have perfect hearing and can distinguish the sex of singers??

So, does anyone else perceive:
1) Tracy Chapman to have a male-sounding voice?
2) Johnny Nash to have a female-sounding voice?

Are there any other examples of this "sex-perception interesting peculiar phenomenon"?

I would appreciate it if anyone can comment or even have a theory to explain this interesting peculiar phenomenon.

0811 HKSAR Name of the Day

Simpson Cheung Wai-Ming, student, School of Communications, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong


About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare; Son-suffix

Wednesday, 13 April 2011

Gagarin Google Doodle

Wow, we have achieved half a century of human spaceflight.

If we look at what has been achieved with a full century of human aviation, just imagine what the next 50 years of human spaceflight will bring!!

Google Doodle celebrating Yuri Gagarin's first human to orbit the Earth in 1961


Related Posts
Magnifisolation, according to Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin
Conspiracy Idiot Collects Comeuppance from Astronaut Hero Buzz Aldrin

0810 HKSAR Name of the Day

Peggo Lam Kwok-wai (Mr), science officer, Department Of Rehabilitation Sciences, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong


About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation

Tuesday, 12 April 2011

Mormon Exploits Time in Hong Kong

As a young, clueless morman mormon stuck in Hong Kong for two years doing missionary work, here's what you can do. Learn the local lingo of course! Think of your two-year sentence as a cultural and linguistic exchange.

That's what brother Carlos Vidal did (see SCMP story here and partly below).

Unless there is obvious profiteering and queueing to be had in converting to Mormonism, the locals will not want to hear any crazy nonsense about Joseph Smith (dum dum dum dum dum from South Park Studios), so don't waste time peddling that cock-and-bull story. Instead, just seek out locals who want to learn English and offer to have regular meetings just to chat. That way, the locals get to learn English and you get to learn crazy nonsense about Hot Hong Kong girls. Fair exchange, eh mate?

For instance ...

Learn how to identify typical Hot Hong Kong girls by learning the term gung jyuh behng to denote Hong Kong girls who are high-maintenance and behave like princesses spoilt brats.

Leverage this local knowledge to nab a Hong Kong girlfriend (just as brother Vidal has done). And because of the mormon faith, it is conceivable to move to, say, Utah, and practice polygamy too. Just imagine having more than one Hong Kong gung jyuh behng. It's enough to drive even the nicest, most mildest mormon insane! Lol.


In case you missed it, here is the Morman headline mistake in the SCMP



Mormon wins fans with humorous take on Cantonese slang (SCMP; paywall)
Lana La
Apr 10, 2011

A Canadian Mormon who spent two years in Hong Kong in his teens has become so popular on YouTube with his comedic take on Cantonese slang that Cathay Pacific (SEHK: 0293) has bankrolled his flight to the city.

Carlos Vidal (pictured), 25, lives in Vancouver and arrives in Hong Kong tomorrow as one of eight finalists in a travel competition run by the airline.

His claim to fame is the two dozen videos he made at home under his stage name, Carlos Douh, the surname being the pinyin of a Chinese surname, To, that his Cantonese teacher gave him seven years ago.

His most popular video has had 800,000 views and describes the phrase gung jyuh behng, or princess sickness, which refers to young Hong Kong girls who are high-maintenance and behave like princesses.

The next most popular video is for chok yeung, which refers to an exaggerated, model-like pose in a photo, similar to the "blue steel" phrase from US film Zoolander.

"Everybody likes that one because it's pretty in right now. It was pretty popular in December and January, too," Vidal said.

In just three months, he's attracted 2.8 million views of his videos and almost 22,000 subscribers to his YouTube channel. He's even selling T-shirts with a trademark phrase. "I don't feel like a celebrity but everyone keeps saying that I am," he said.

Last week, he was made a YouTube partner, which means he is starting to cash in on his celebrity status. But it's only small fry, for now. He makes a profit every time someone views a video and watches the preview advertisement.

"It's not very much yet. In one week, I put up one video and it got about 20,000 views and made about US$70," he said.

Vidal's love for the Cantonese language started when he lived in Hong Kong from 2004 for two years doing voluntary missionary work with his church.

"It slowly progressed over time and I was able to get the hang of it. My Chinese is still far from sounding exactly like a native. It's a really complex language and there's lots to learn, but it's fun to be able to communicate with people now. I feel like I understand and have learned a lot more about the people and the culture through their own language."

His girlfriend also helps with his language skills. "She's originally from Hong Kong and her native language is Cantonese so we speak mostly Cantonese together," he said.

Now in his final year of a business degree in Canada, Vidal said he found his YouTube niche by accident after he started making videos teaching people how to speak Cantonese last October.

"Instead of teaching regular, everyday words which wouldn't get that many views, I started doing slang words and people just thought it was really funny.

"American-born Chinese teenagers and college-age students were watching and learning new slang. So it just kind of picked up from there.

"There's tonnes of different slang words but I think, `How can I make this one funny and creative in a video?' So I pick the ones that I have ideas for. Fans now are also suggesting things."

But don't expect any swear words, despite profanity being central to Cantonese slang: "That's just not my style," he said.

0809 HKSAR Name of the Day

Minerva Cheng, student, School of Communications, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong


About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare; Self-important

Monday, 11 April 2011

0808 HKSAR Name of the Day

Jervis Tang Chi-shing (Mr), physiotherapist, Department Of Rehabilitation Sciences, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong


About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Sunday, 10 April 2011

0807 HKSAR Name of the Day

Eleven Liu (Ms), student, School of Communications, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong


About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation; Insertion

Saturday, 9 April 2011

0806 HKSAR Name of the Day

Chetwyn Chan (Dr), associate head and professor, Department Of Rehabilitation Sciences, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong


About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Friday, 8 April 2011

0805 HKSAR Name of the Day

Camny Wong Lai-yun, final year business studies student, Baptist University, Hong Kong (2009)

see 0635 HKSAR Name of the Day


About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation

Thursday, 7 April 2011

0804 HKSAR Name of the Day

Joeson Wong (Mr), personal associate, Jockey Club Rehabilitation Engineering Centre, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong


About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation; Substitution; Son-suffix

Wednesday, 6 April 2011

Footy and Frankenstein Fotos

Doppelgangers and Frankenstein's creation (please see below).


In a previous comment, I mentioned the Guardians (Owls) of Ga'Hoole. A movie was made from the first three books by Kathryn Lasky, and the theme song is sung by this guy who bears a similar likeness to Lionel Messi.










































Carlos Tevez has a really nasty skin problem ... good job he no longer needs his neck-bolts to help steady his head. Besides, players are not allowed to wear jewellery and adornments on the pitch.



To The Sky (From The Soundtrack For The Original Motion Picture)

0803 HKSAR Name of the Day

Sania Yau Sau-wai, chief executive of the New Life Psychiatric Rehabilitation Association, and head of the Integrated Community Centre for Mental Wellness in Tin Shui Wai, Hong Kong


About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation

Tuesday, 5 April 2011

Talkin' Bout a Revolution

(from SCMP cartoon 3/4/2011)


... because the name sounds way too normal. If you want my advice, try for something unique, novel and creative and then your little 'un will truly fit in to Hong Kong society ...


Related

Talkin Bout A Revolution, Tracy Chapman (lyrics)

0802 HKSAR Name of the Day

Weida Day, colorectal surgeon, department of surgery, Kwong Wah Hospital


About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation

Monday, 4 April 2011

Spring Spring Spring in Hong Kong

O Koel birdsong what a beautiful sound
Bringing freshness and delight to all around

A piercing, lilting, simple song you may be

Ne'ertheless you still invoke Spring to me



Koel birdsong in Hong Kong

video

The above videoclip of an Asian Koel was taken a couple of weekends ago. But then the weather turned cold again. This weekend, the sunny weather seems to have returned so I thought it would be a good time to post this.

Spring is finally here in Hong Kong. Warmer, sunnier days now lie ahead. So pack away those winter woolies and begin to sweat like Mammoth woolies!


And here's another Asian Koel on YouTube

0801 HKSAR Name of the Day

Rockson Wei, doctor, Caritas Medical Centre, Hong Kong


About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation; Son-suffix

Sunday, 3 April 2011

Mormans, Mormons, Morons

Same difference. The three title words remind me of the children's game where you get to change one letter at a time to create a new word (substitution, deletion, addition, translocation*).

* this is similar to how this blog's novel names are categorised

LDS Church (the 12-storey orange building) in Wan Chai. Pic from VictoriaOP

This post's headline refers to this news article (see below). Interestingly, the printed headline correctly used Morons Mormons but the online headline misspelled it as Mormans.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is another example of how organised religion brainwash young children and exploit the young to recruit more innocents.


South Park creators write Broadway musical that throws the book at Mormans (SCMP; paywall)
Is nothing sacred? Evidently not to the creators of South Park, who have written a Broadway musical that throws the book at Mormons

Mark Kennedy
Apr 01, 2011

For years, writers Trey Parker and Matt Stone have lampooned everything, from Scientology to Tiger Woods, Toyota Prius drivers to Islam, Britney Spears to the great state of New Jersey.

Now the twisted minds behind South Park have crossed another line: they're spoofing the Mormon church in a big, brassy Broadway musical that opened last week.

Together with Avenue Q writer Robert Lopez, the duo have left behind their foul-mouthed elementary students to tell a story about two young missionaries whose faith is rocked when they come face-to-face with famine, war and HIV/Aids in Africa.

The Book of Mormon, which stars Josh Gad and Andrew Rannells, has foul language, some brilliantly sarcastic songs, references to genital mutilation, plenty of suppressed homosexuality, tap-dancing Mormons, war crimes threatened on an infant, Darth Vader and a character who complains about having maggots in his scrotum.

While the show makes fun of several Broadway shows including Fela! and The Lion King, Parker and Stone have maintained the structure and feel of a traditional musical.

"We thought from the beginning the biggest challenge was to write a real Broadway musical," says Stone. "With unconventional material, sure. But to do unconventional material conventionally."

Parker and Stone also say a show about Mormons isn't that strange when you consider other religious-themed musicals such as Jesus Christ Superstar.

Parker, 41, and Stone, 39, worked on the musical on and off for about seven years, putting it away each time they had to make another episode of their popular series.

They've mulled the idea of a Mormon musical since college and found that their dream was shared by Lopez, whom they met after watching and loving Avenue Q, a musical that featured foul-mouthed puppets and sassy songs.

Picking on Mormons isn't new for the South Park writers: In season 7, they also went after the Church of Latter-day Saints, mostly by mocking participants as relentlessly cheery and by humming "dum, dum, dum" over the animated stories about founder Joseph Smith. But it's not personal, they insist.

"Mormons are pretty darn good at turning the other cheek," says Parker. "They're really good at being really nice," agrees Stone.

They have been proved right.

John Dehlin, a doctoral student who saw the show with a group of fellow Mormons from around the US, was still riveted to his theatre seat, having flashbacks.

"It's way, way too close to home," he says, recalling his own missionary years in Guatemala: the shock at the poverty and violence, the pressure from the mission president to baptise more natives, the despair when his mission companion ran off with a local girl - and the Mormon mandate, above all, to repress doubt and remain relentlessly cheery.

"It's right on," says Dehlin's friend Paul Jones, "but I cringed a little bit, a couple of times."

The musical is proving to be a cringeworthy moment for many Mormons. And yet, though the very name of the show misappropriates the title of the church's sacred scripture, there have been no pickets or boycotts, no outraged news releases by Mormon defenders and no lawsuits.

This is intentional. Mormons want people to know they can take it. The Mormon Church has signalled to members to turn the other cheek, while quietly preparing to make the best of the publicity - for instance, posting material on the church's website about the growth of the faith in Africa.

Meanwhile, more liberal Mormons are making pilgrimages to New York to see it. They are even celebrating the show as a sign that their faith has made the big time.

"Mormonism is mainstream," said Dustin Jones, a lawyer and a Mormon from Phoenix, who saw the show with Dehlin, "and when you want to be a mainstream religion you open yourself up to mainstream criticism. Catholics have been subject to criticism for decades. Now we've arrived and we're on Broadway."

Which brings us to the question: Is nothing sacred to Parker and Stone? No, they say. Nothing can be ruled out for ridicule.

Associated Press, The New York Times

0800 HKSAR Name of the Day

Axel Tse, Wong Tai Sin, Hong Kong (SCMP letters 3 April 2010)


About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Saturday, 2 April 2011

0799 HKSAR Name of the Day

Kingsley Chan Hau-ngai, dermatologist, Hong Kong


About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Friday, 1 April 2011

0798 HKSAR Name of the Day

Corence Wong Ping-yiu (Mr), general manager, Hong Kong International Education Expo, Hong Kong


About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation