Monday, 30 December 2013

1312 HKSAR Name of the Day

Sunny Chow, Tsuen Wan, Hong Kong (SCMP letters 31 Dec 2011)

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare; Phonetic-based? somewhat common in Hong Kong

Saturday, 28 December 2013

1311 HKSAR Name of the Day

Isis Ching See-nga, Tsuen Wan, Hong Kong (SCMP letters 28 Dec 2011)

 "Isis" is the most powerful of all female goddesses of ancient Egypt 

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare; Self-important

Thursday, 26 December 2013

1310 HKSAR Name of the Day

Dr Yeung Yeung, orthopaedic surgeon, Matilda International Hospital, Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation

Tuesday, 24 December 2013

1309 HKSAR Name of the Day

Katiryn Cheung Suen, Fanling, Hong Kong (SCMP letters 24 Dec 2011)

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation; Deletion

Sunday, 22 December 2013

1308 HKSAR Name of the Day

Aden Wong Chi-shun, animal rights protest organizer, Hong Kong

 meaning of Aden is "fire"

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Friday, 20 December 2013

1307 HKSAR Name of the Day

Dino Lee, flatmate of Canadian student Joseph Basha, 25, who was found dead in a Hong Kong public toilet (Dec 2011) see news article

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Wednesday, 18 December 2013

1306 HKSAR Name of the Day

Ira Li Hoi-ching, Tsuen Wan, Hong Kong (SCMP letters 16 Dec 2011)

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Monday, 16 December 2013

1305 HKSAR Name of the Day

Apollo Sze, Cheung Sha Wan, Hong Kong (SCMP letters 16 Dec 2011) who suggested renaming Hong Kong's International Airport (Chek Lap Kok) after Bruce Lee

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare; Literature-based; Self-important

Saturday, 14 December 2013

1304 HKSAR Name of the Day

Jackson Yu Chik-sum, acting general secretary (1998), Hong Kong Football Association, Hong Kong

  see 1026, 1081, 1106

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare; Son-suffix; somewhat common in Hong Kong

Thursday, 12 December 2013

Tuesday, 10 December 2013

1302 HKSAR Name of the Day

Moses Chan Ho, television actor, TVB, Hong Kong
  see other Moses 0112, 0489, 0591, 0942, 1140, 1225
  see These Two Pairs of Toeses

Moses Chan (centre) with Marina Vorobeva and Christine Yeung

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Literature-based; Rare; Self-important; Somewhat common in Hong Kong

Sunday, 8 December 2013

1301 HKSAR Name of the Day

Jacque Ip Pak-kan, researcher in neuroscience, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Friday, 6 December 2013

1300 HKSAR Name of the Day

Real Ting Chi-ko, public relations consultant and husband to local singer-actress Miriam Yeung Chin-wah, Hong Kong

Miriam Yeung and Real Ting


About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation

Wednesday, 4 December 2013

1299 HKSAR Name of the Day

Newman Wong Hing-wai, lawyer and prosecutor for the government against Manuel Chan Tim-shing (see 1298 HKSAR Name of the Day), 52, former Eastern District councillor accused of cheating the government out of HK$1.7 million in tax.

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Monday, 2 December 2013

1298 HKSAR Name of the Day

Manuel Chan Tim-shing, 52, Former Eastern District councillor accused of cheating the government out of HK$1.7 million in tax by making false claims to pay for salaries and other expenses at his own apparel business (January 2012)

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Saturday, 30 November 2013

1297 HKSAR Name of the Day

Vyora Yau, principal assistant secretary for the environment (financial monitoring), Environment Bureau, Hong Kong Government, Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation

Thursday, 28 November 2013

1296 HKSAR Name of the Day

Archer Wong Tik-lung, student union's university affairs secretary, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Tuesday, 26 November 2013

1295 HKSAR Name of the Day

Elmy Lung, reporter, TVB News, Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation; Substitution

Sunday, 24 November 2013

1294 HKSAR Name of the Day

Tank Lam Hip-hau, 19-year-old part-time coach for the Breakthrough rugby team [Breakthrough is a sports programme for troubled youngsters that has been run by former and current members of the Hong Kong police since 1966], Hong Kong 

see Sherman

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation

Friday, 22 November 2013

1293 HKSAR Name of the Day

Angel Ng Kar-bo, Tsim Sha Shui, Hong Kong (SCMP letters 23 November 2011)
Note: IMHO it would have been better … if her name had been Greta.

Greta Kar-bo has a nice ring to it !!

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare; Self-important

Wednesday, 20 November 2013

1292 HKSAR Name of the Day

Sundy Fong Lok-sun, 29, and Patrick Chan Chi-kit, 30, who married at the weekend (12-13 November 2011) and spent HK$250,000 (US$32,000) on their wedding

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation; Phonetic-based; Substitution

Monday, 18 November 2013

1291 HKSAR Name of the Day

Cathie Chung, real estate researcher, Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Saturday, 16 November 2013

1290 HKSAR Name of the Day

Wyss Ng Yeuk-wan (Ms), toy company manager, Hong Kong (who in 2011 has a 14-year-old daughter, Elyse Ngan Cheuk-shan)
  see also 1097 HKSAR Name of the Day

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation

Thursday, 14 November 2013

1289 HKSAR Name of the Day

Jehan Chu, veteran designer, Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation; Phonetic-based?

Tuesday, 12 November 2013

1288 HKSAR Name of the Day

Stephenie Ma Kit-ting married Pui Wai-loi in Hong Kong; both 27 years old.
They were among 1,017 pairs who got married on 11/11/2011 for its implication of "one life, one love". Considering some (or many?) marriages end up in divorce further down the years, the "implication" may prove to be only that … an implication.

People mistakenly put too much emphasis on "lucky" numbers such as 111111, 1288, etc (see Lucky Number posts) and:

Chinese Cherry Picking

Searching for a Silver Lining in the Manila Massacre

Double Dose of Death on Double Four



About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation; Substitution

Sunday, 10 November 2013

1287 HKSAR Name of the Day

Garrick Kong Chi-leung, a 48-year- old marketing research manager, will take part in the 2012 Standard Chartered Hong Kong Marathon for the third time

see 0674 HKSAR Name of the Day

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Friday, 8 November 2013

1286 HKSAR Name of the Day

Ilona Ho, Shouson Hill, Hong Kong (SCMP letters 9 November 2011)

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Wednesday, 6 November 2013

1285 HKSAR Name of the Day

Karen Chan Kar-loen, associate professor of the University of Hong Kong's department of obstetrics and gynecology, Hong Kong

not particularly novel but phonetic-based (and propagates the stereotype that Orientals mispronounce their l's and r's). Nice going Professor Chan !

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Common but Phonetic-based

Tuesday, 5 November 2013

Jung Chang Looking Like A Wild Swan

Over the decades, popular author and modern China historian Jung Chang, 61, has carved out her writing genre in striking fashion. Her recent photo is also striking and reminds me of an elegant, regal and extremely poised swan.

Jung Chang. Photo: AFP



Related Post

So That's What She Looks Like



Reference


Jung Chang’s revisionist account of ‘the concubine who launched modern China’ (SCMP; paywall)

Wild Swans author has written a new book on Empress Dowager Cixi
PUBLISHED : Sunday, 03 November, 2013, 5:02pm

Agence France-Presse in Hong Kong

Jung Chang says she does not enjoy arguments, but the latest book from the writer whose works are banned in China is proving to be typically contentious.

The Wild Swans author has offered a revisionist account of Empress Dowager Cixi, the concubine who ruled behind the scenes from 1861 until her death in 1908.

A powerful figure who unofficially controlled the Manchu Qing Dynasty for nearly 50 years, Cixi governed during a tumultuous period in which she faced internal rebellions, war and foreign invasions.

Cixi has since been portrayed as a cruel, hapless despot with an extravagant lifestyle, a conservative who suppressed reform in China for decades, who ordered the killing of reformists and put the emperor under house arrest for years until his death.

Having scoured Chinese language archives in Beijing, Chang instead argues that Cixi was instead a reformer who laid the foundations for China to become the economic superpower of today.

“I’m not one of those who relish a fight. I don’t enjoy it,” the 61-year-old author said in an interview.

“But I don’t want to write what everyone else is writing. I will only embark on a project if there is something new I can say. So I can’t reconcile these two things. If you open new ground you’re going to be attacked.”
I will only embark on a project if there is something new I can say. If you open new ground you’re going to be attacked
Jung Chang

Empress Dowager Cixi - The Concubine Who Launched Modern China presents a figure whose leadership enabled the country to begin to “acquire virtually all the attributes of a modern state: railways, electricity, telegraph, telephones, Western medicine, a modern-style army and navy, and modern ways of conducting foreign trade and diplomacy.

“The past hundred years have been most unfair to Cixi,” writes Chang.

The Sichuan-born, London-based author says Cixi - and not reformist leader Deng Xiaoping who took power after the death of Mao Zedong - should be credited with launching the China of today.

“He didn’t create a new model,” Chang said of Deng. “He was returning to the model that had been created by the Empress Dowager.”

The book has received positive reviews, but critics have also cautioned against the level of Chang’s praise for a woman largely demonised by history.

“Historical facts seem to have been used only when they were useful and tossed away when they contradict the main theme of her work; that the heretofore-vilified Cixi had been a brave and forward-thinking reformer,” read a comment piece published in the South China Morning Post recently.

“It may be fashionable today to create a feminist heroine out of thin air, even if in fact there was none. Cixi was not a reformer”.

Chang says she sought to provide the context for Cixi’s ruthlessness, which went as far as ordering the poisoning of her nephew and adopted son Emperor Guangxu, while on her own death bed.

“Japan tried to make him the puppet and dominate the whole of China. The inevitable conclusion for me is that she killed him in order to prevent this scenario.”

While Guangxu’s successor Pu Yi became Japan’s puppet-leader in Manchukuo, the state it established after invading Manchuria, Chang argues that the entire country would have eventually fallen to Japan had Cixi not ordered the death of Guangxu.

‘Unjust’ criticism

The author admits that she did “develop sympathy” for Cixi, and some critics have accused the book of bordering on hagiography.

“I documented her ruthlessness,” said Chang. “Every killing is documented in the book. Let’s not forget she was a 19th century figure, she grew up in medieval China.”

Chang said she was drawn to the story of Cixi when researching her multi-million selling debut Wild Swans more than 20 years ago.

“My grandmother had bound feet and I had been under the impression because of the propaganda that somehow foot binding was banned by the Communists,” said Chang.

“I realised it had been banned by Cixi at the beginning of the 20th century. So this discrepancy between the little bit I knew about her and her reputation got me very interested.”

The book is the follow up to the explosive 2005 biography Mao: The Unknown Story which she co-authored with her husband Jon Halliday.

It won praise for challenging perceptions of Mao, the founder of the People’s Republic of China who instigated the Cultural Revolution in 1966 and whose rule is estimated to have caused tens of millions of deaths through starvation, forced labour and executions.

But it also faced strong academic criticism over its balance and scholarship. The author, who lost her father and grandfather to the Cultural Revolution, says such criticism is “totally unjust”.

Along with 1991’s Wild Swans her study of Mao is banned in China. Chang says she is permitted to visit her elderly mother on the mainland on the condition that she does not speak to the press, at public gatherings or visit friends.

As for whether or not her latest book will be banned, Chang says she expects sensitivity given what she sees as parallels between Cixi and a modern leadership looking to calibrate the pace of change in order to maintain control.

“In both cases there have been decades of economic development,” said Chang.

“She faced the same problems. A door has been opened, people have rising aspirations. And so where do we go from here?”


Monday, 4 November 2013

1284 HKSAR Name of the Day

Esmond Lee Chung-sin, Principal Assistant Secretary for Planning, Environment and Lands, Hong Kong Government, Hong Kong (circa 1997)

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Saturday, 2 November 2013

1283 HKSAR Name of the Day

Dawson Fong To-sang (Dr), neurosurgeon and president of the Hong Kong Stroke Fund

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare; Son-suffix

Thursday, 31 October 2013

1282 HKSAR Name of the Day

Yannie Chan, reporter, HK Magazine, Hong Kong

see Yannie Soo 1281 HSKAR Name of the Day

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation; Subsitution

Wednesday, 30 October 2013

Free Saucepans for Pots of Money

Isn't this kinda obvious? There's no such thing as a free lunch ...


Reference

Wellcome's 'free' saucepan set may require you to spend HK$115,200 (SCMP; paywall)

To earn enough stamps for all seven saucepans on offer, Wellcome customers must spend up to HK$115,200. Time for honesty, blogger says
PUBLISHED : Sunday, 27 October, 2013, 5:30am

Simon Parry

Wellcome saucepans offers are not so free. Photo: SCMP

They're smart and shiny, stylish, glass-lidded, they look as if they'd add a measure of practical panache to any Hong Kong kitchen … and best of all, they're free.

There's a catch, of course: what shoppers might not realise about the German-branded set of seven "free" saucepans Wellcome is offering in its latest promotion is that they will need to spend up to HK$115,200 at the store to get their hands on the set.

Collecting enough "Happy Stamps" - handed out at the rate of one for every HK$60 spent - to get the smallest of the pans will cost a customer HK$10,800 at the checkout at regular times. The biggest will cost HK$22,800.

What's more, while they are advertised in fliers handed out to shoppers as being "German Woll Stainless Steel Kitchenware Collection" and carry the Woll brand, small print on the same leaflets reveals the saucepans are actually made in China, apparently under licence.

Customer Jo Dehaney highlighted the cost of the "free" saucepans in her Sai Kung Living blog after standing in a long queue at her local branch of Wellcome with time for a spot of mental arithmetic.

"I thought 'Oh good - free pans'," she wrote later on her blog. "I started thinking about which ones I would find most useful, but the queue was long, and I was bored, and before long I started calculating how much these fine German, made-in-China cookware pieces were really going to cost me. The results were staggering."

The smallest saucepan, a 16cm 1.5-litre casserole pot, which the promotional leaflets say has a "standard price" of HK$1,280, costs 210 Happy Stamps - equivalent to grocery spending of HK$12,600 at regular times.

The biggest, a 24cm 7.9-litre stockpot, which has a standard price of HK$1,980, costs 380 Happy Stamps - for which a shopper would have to spend HK$22,800.

To get the whole set of seven saucepans - valued by the Wellcome leaflets at HK$10,360 - a customer would need to collect 1,920 Happy Stamps which, at HK$60 per stamp, would cost HK$115,200 in shopping.

Double stamps are given out for spends of HK$350 or more at weekends and extra stamps are given for "bonus buy" items, so a canny customer who times their visits and always spends over HK$350 could bring down the total cost to HK$57,600 or less.

But Dehaney argued that it was at the very least cheeky of Wellcome to describe the items as free.

"They use words like 'happy' and 'free', but it's nonsense," she said. "The stamps aren't particularly happy and the saucepans most definitely aren't free.

"I think they should just try being honest with their customers instead of coming out with gimmicks like this. People are already realising that it's better to go to small shops. The prices in supermarkets in Hong Kong are just too high."

Wellcome, owned by the Dairy Farm Group, declined to give an interview to the Sunday Morning Post about the promotion and instead issued a statement in response to questions from the newspaper through the public relations firm GolinHarris. The statement said: "We are … committed in ensuring that customers have sufficient information to make informed decisions about their purchases by providing sufficient product information via multiple channels such as newspapers and electronic media."



Tuesday, 29 October 2013

1281 HKSAR Name of the Day

Yannie Soo Oi-yan (Dr), specialist in neurology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong

see Yammie Lam 0925 HKSAR name of the Day

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation; Substitution

Sunday, 27 October 2013

1280 HKSAR Name of the Day

Edison Tam Hin-yan, Sai Kung, Hong Kong (SCMP letters 9 November 2011)

see 0578 and 0375 HKSAR Names of the Day

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Friday, 25 October 2013

1279 HKSAR Name of the Day

Icy Wong Yuen Man, Hong Kong weather girl

credit to Aimless Wanderer

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation; Substitution 

Wednesday, 23 October 2013

1278 HKSAR Name of the Day

Violet Chong, Sheung Wan, Hong Kong (SCMP letters 17 October 2011)

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Monday, 21 October 2013

1277 HKSAR Name of the Day

Pensi Lam, Tsuen Wan, Hong Kong (SCMP letters 11 October 2011)

Translocation! (swap around “i” and “s” and you get Penis ! How about a female novel name called Vagian ?)

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation

Saturday, 19 October 2013

1276 HKSAR Name of the Day

Dicken Ng, brother of missing schoolgirl Janet Ng Chun-yee apparently found dead on Victoria Peak (September 2013), Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation


Reference

Body found on Victoria Peak maybe missing schoolgirl (SCMP; paywall)
Monday, 09 September, 2013 [Updated: 7:58AM]

Danny Mok danny.mok@scmp.com

A body found yesterday near a walking trail at The Peak is believed to be that of missing schoolgirl Janet Ng Chun-yee, who disappeared last Sunday.

Janet Ng Chun-yeeThe discovery was made by firefighters at about 3pm on a hill off the Governor's Walk, which skirts around Victoria Peak Garden. Police believe the girl died a few days ago.

The rescue crew had been searching for 16-year-old Janet, who was last seen at a restaurant on Yee Wo Street in Causeway Bay on the afternoon of September 1.

She had been dining with friends from St Clare's Girls' School, the elite school she attended. She asked them to join her on a trip to The Peak but they declined, so she went alone.

Police said the height and clothing of the body matched the description of Janet. Nothing suspicious was found, nor was there a suicide note.

However, Janet had sent several instant messages via WhatsApp to her classmates on September 1 at about 2.30pm saying she was "on the way to hell", and "I will die today".

One of her classmates replied: "You want to kill yourself just because the school has been [painted] pink. You are really silly."

Another friend said: "You could just leave the school. Do you really need to die?"

Janet replied: "Forget it. You guys don't understand this."

Later, at about 6pm, Janet sent a photograph to her brother Dicken Ng, taken near Victoria Peak Garden, with the message: "Super beautiful Victoria Peak Garden".

That was the last message she sent before she apparently switched her phone off.

Janet's family reported her missing on September 2.

Police and the Civil Aid Service searched the area and other places where Janet went.

Lucia Lau Fung-yi, the principal of St Clare's, said last week that Janet was a lively and cheerful girl and there was no sign that she would try to commit suicide.
 
This article appeared in the South China Morning Post print edition as Body found on Peak maybe missing schoolgirl

Thursday, 17 October 2013

1275 HKSAR Name of the Day

Defranco Leung, local wine wholesaler, Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation; Self-important

Tuesday, 15 October 2013

1274 HKSAR Name of the Day

Buggle Lau Ka-fai, chief analyst, Midland Realty, Hong Kong

  Note 1: Spike at Hongkie Town mentioned Buggle too

  Note 2: There is a doctor in Singapore called Buggle too

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation


Recent Reference

Hong Kong peg to US dollar blamed for city's soaring property prices (SCMP; paywall)
Monday, 14 October, 2013, 1:56pm

Sandy Li sandy.li@scmp.com

Home prices in Hong Kong have now surpassed the 1997 peak.

The pegging of the Hong Kong dollar to the US dollar has been blamed for creating artificially low interest rates that contribute to the city's sky-high property prices.

However, some analysts warn that Hong Kong's real estate market would face immense challenges if the peg is removed.

Average home prices have soared more than tenfold from HK$700 per square foot in 1983 - when the Hong Kong dollar was pegged to the US dollar - to HK$7,244 last month, based on gross floor area, according to data compiled by Midland Realty.

"When our currency was pegged to the greenback, it marked the day when we sacrificed our role and ability to set interest rates," said Midland Realty chief analyst Buggle Lau Ka-fai.

Hong Kong's property market has experienced wild swings over the past three decades. It began a sustained upward trend from 1983, hitting a peak in October 1997. But home prices then plunged 70 per cent and entered a prolonged downward trend after the Asian financial crisis. Prices bottomed out in August 2003 and have since climbed again. Prices have now surpassed the 1997 peak by 17.6 per cent, prompting the government to launch a string of measures to rein in the red-hot market.

"Property prices have shot up whenever we see devaluation of the US dollar as our assets become more affordable to overseas investors," Lau said. "As Hong Kong is an import economy, it will boost our inflation and encourage investors to buy properties as a way of hedging against rising inflation."

A case in point was the 26 per cent appreciation of the yuan against the US dollar over the past 10 years, which sparked a buying spree by mainlanders looking for new homes in the city and sent prices to new heights until the Hong Kong government imposed a 15 per cent buyer's stamp duty in October last year.

Andrew Lawrence, the managing director of real estate equities research at Malaysian investment bank CIMB Securities, said the impact of cheap housing credit could be seen by comparing property transaction volumes with mortgage approvals.

Before 2009, about 75 per cent of property transactions required a mortgage, yet following the drop in mortgage rates nearly every property transaction had been mortgage-funded, Lawrence said.

"Homeowners have become ever more reliant on debt to fund their property purchases," he said.

Mortgage interest rates have dropped to 2.3 per cent from a high of 10 per cent in 1990 and 2000.

Asked how Hong Kong property prices would be hit if the city abandoned the peg, Lawrence said the question was what currency it would be repegged to.

"It will most likely repeg to the yuan, which would mean we would have to adapt to the mainland's high interest rate," he said. "It would effectively impose a significant change in terms of interest rates."

But Lawrence said that was unlikely to happen until the yuan became fully convertible, and by then the Hong Kong dollar would be replaced by the yuan. "There will no Hong Kong dollar and we will be trading in yuan," he said.

This article appeared in the South China Morning Post print edition as Currency link to blame for soaring property prices

Sunday, 13 October 2013

1273 HKSAR Name of the Day

Homer Tso Wei-kwok (Dr), head, Hong Kong Dental Council
see 0014 HKSAR Name of the Day

Dr Homer Tso … D'oh!!! (Pic from SCMP)

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare; Literature-based

Friday, 11 October 2013

1272 HKSAR Name of the Day

Toni Ip (Mr), also called Goatee Toni, Hong Kong-based naturalist with a menagerie of more than 1,000 animals in Fanling

A squirrel with Toni Ip (Pic from SCMP)

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Wednesday, 9 October 2013

1271 HKSAR Name of the Day

Bertha Yeung Ming-sze (Miss), Assistant Curator, Hong Kong Science Museu

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Tuesday, 8 October 2013

Health Living … Not

Hong Kong bodybuilder Anna Christianne Ho says health goes beyond the skin. Photo: SCMP

Can having exceptional muscle definition and tone really be defined as healthy living? This seems to be a dubious claim.

Anna Christianne Ho, silver medalist at the 2013 Asian Bodybuilding and Physique Sports Championship in Vietnam, claims: "What matters is to take care of your heart, lungs and other organs. A healthy workout is better than just paying attention to your skin."

But Ho is endorsing bodybuilding as healthy living. This is wrong (or perhaps the journalist is reporting it wrong?). A healthy lifestyle should comprise a balance of an effective exercise regime with effective nutrition intake. Bodybuilding is an unhealthy balance because it amounts to achieving a very low body fat composition by restricting nutritional and water intake, which has repercussions on the body's functions (e.g. affecting hormonal levels, metabolism, stamina, endurance, etc).

Although Ho did well in the "athletic physique category", this does not mean she is an athlete. There are plenty of proper athletes who have better physiques and who really do perform (which indicates they have good-functioning "hearts, lungs and other organs"). These are proper athletes who have strength, stamina, skill and "sportiness". They showcase their sporting prowess and physicality by using their bodies to achieve high performance levels at their peak.

Bodybuilders, in attempting to achieve their peak, restrict their water and food intake just to show off their muscle definition. Bodybuilding cannot be considered healthy living or healthy performance.

Simply compare the body of Ho with, say, Kimiko Date, another 40-something or Rebecca Zhu, winner of Miss Hong Kong 2011, who has a well-conditioned and healthy body (from her years spent training as a ballerina).


Related Posts

Healthy And Fit From My Perspective

Tennis Health and Fitness Views


Reference

Anna Ho's passion for healthy living takes her to bodybuilding's world championships (SCMP; paywall)

Pursuit of fitness rather than just superficial beauty has paid off for 46-year-old
Sunday, 06 October, 2013, 1:55am

Alvin Sallay alvin.sallay@scmp.com

Beauty being skin deep, Anna Christianne Ho decided a long time ago that she would prefer to devote her energy towards having a truly healthy body instead of one just pretty on the surface. Ten years later, her efforts paid off when she won a silver medal at the Asian Bodybuilding and Physique Sports Championship in Vietnam last month.

Think bodybuilding and the stereotypical images are Arnold Schwarzenegger flexing his biceps and grunting "I'll be back", or of Lou Ferrigno bursting his shirt and turning green with rage. So, on the lookout for a ripped female giant, I was surprised when my subject walked into our Starbucks rendezvous rake-thin and with a mischievous smile on her face.

"Everyone expects a bodybuilder to be sprouting muscles but in my case it is more about muscle definition and tone, as I'm in one of the smaller weight categories," Ho says. "In Hong Kong, women are all generally of a smaller size and as such we compete in the model physique category or, like I do, in the athletic physique category."

If it was boxing, she would be competing in the lightest weight category. Weighing around 47 kilograms, Ho excelled in the Ho Chi Minh City event, which drew 350 contestants from 27 countries. She was just pipped to the gold by a Thai competitor.

"It was amazing. I only returned to Hong Kong from living abroad last year and I soon found myself in the thick of it all, winning a local competition. It was a great feeling to stand on the podium representing Hong Kong."

Bitten by the bug, she has now set her sights higher and will represent Hong Kong at next month's World bodybuilding and Physique Sports Championships in Budapest, Hungary, along with two other medal winners at the Asian competition - Josephine Yeung Ka-yin and Zico Hau Kin-man, bronze-medal winners in model physique and men's fitness respectively.

It all began for Ho, 46, soon after her second child was born 10 year ago. A yoga and fitness practitioner, she decided bodybuilding would suit her passion for healthy living.

"It is a lifestyle I chose. In Hong Kong, most women focus on beauty. They want to be thin rather than healthy," Ho said. "But being beautiful on the outside does not really help - what matters is to take care of your heart, lungs and other organs. A healthy workout is better than just paying attention to your skin."

As she is a physical trainer by profession, the healthy workout was readily available, and it was just a matter of taking the next step to become a bodybuilder.

"It's all about discipline, especially your diet. We bodybuilders have to be very careful about what we eat. While it is not so bad on a daily basis, when it comes closer to competition time, you have to make a lot of sacrifices, the biggest being water intake."

While she tries to cut down as much as possible on salt, sugar and oil in her normal diet - "I occasionally fry an egg with three drops of olive oil" - Ho as a habit drinks alkaline water ("it helps detox your body"), eats a lot of protein ("mainly fish") and maybe a slice of rye bread. A piece or two of dark chocolate is a treat and when she really wants to indulge, she will go for a piece of creamy Japanese cheesecake.

"If you train yourself and make it a habit, it becomes easy. If you have been eating dessert all your life, try to cut it by half, and then another half and before you know it the benefits will start showing."

Ten days before the Asian championships, Ho cut down her water intake drastically, making do with 800 millilitres a day to increase her muscle definition and "vascularity". "Your veins jut out and you become more ripped," she says.

A member of the Hong Kong China Bodybuilding Association, Ho admits her sport struggles with an image of being riddled with doping and steroids.

"Even though the sport is practised by a small handful and is overshadowed by drug scandals, the Hong Kong China Bodybuilding Association would like to raise awareness, not only of its health and fitness benefits but also so we can portray the correct body image which our vibrant population, especially the youth, should try to adopt," says Ho.

Ho stresses that she and all other athletes are constantly being monitored by the Hong Kong Anti-Doping Committee, and that they are clean.

"We have to undergo random urine tests taken out of competition and I'm pleased to say that we are all clean. This is all about living a healthy life and why would you want to dope yourself?" she says.



Monday, 7 October 2013

1270 HKSAR Name of the Day

Warwick Ngan Kee, professor, anaesthesia and intensive care, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare; Geography-based

Saturday, 5 October 2013

1269 HKSAR Name of the Day

Athena Chu Yan, local actress, Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare; Self-important

Thursday, 3 October 2013

1268 HKSAR Name of the Day

Winifred Chung, spokeswoman, Tourism Commission, Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Tuesday, 1 October 2013

1267 HKSAR Name of the Day

Kannis Yeung Yee-man (Ms), celebrity chef, Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation

Sunday, 29 September 2013

1266 HKSAR Name of the Day

Kennis Tsang, Sau Mau Ping, Hong Kong (SCMP letters 3 Sept 2011)

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation

Saturday, 28 September 2013

Large Fat Tongues

I've noticed more TV presenters and celebrities who have large fat tongues. This makes them talk in a characteristic and noticeable way (lispy, if you like). For example, TV chefs Jamie Oliver and Allegra McEvedy.

And then coincidentally, while watching a BBC documentary called The Men Who Made Us Fat, the presenter Jacques Peretti also had a large fat tongue. A doctor put him in an MRI machine and examined how much internal (visceral) fat he had. Peretti is a classic example known as a TOFI; thin outside fat inside.

Has there been any studies that have linked fat people (either obese, overweight or TOFI's) with having large fat tongues? Can the presence of having a large fat tongue be a predictor that someone has, or could have, a dangerous amount of fat in their bodies?


Apparently, Hong Kong people look healthy but in actual fact many of them as classic TOFI's (see post here).

Food for thought !!


The Men Who Made Us Fat Part 1 of 12 (YouTube)





Friday, 27 September 2013

1265 HKSAR Name of the Day

Pierre Pang, research assistant, Professional Teachers' Union, Hong Kon

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Wednesday, 25 September 2013

1264 HKSAR Name of the Day

Edison Chen Koon-hei, HK celebrity, Hong Kong
see 0578 HKSAR Name of the Day and Bobo Chan sex-photos scandal

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare; son-suffix

Monday, 23 September 2013

1263 HKSAR Name of the Day

Randy Miu, Pok Fu Lam, Hong Kong (SCMP letters 3 Sept 2011)

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare for females; Rare for males

Saturday, 21 September 2013

1262 HKSAR Name of the Day

Queeny Au Yeung Kwai-yue, judge (Madam Justice), Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation; Self-important

Thursday, 19 September 2013

1261 HKSAR Name of the Day

Bobo Cheung, assistant marketing manager, Tai Pan Mooncakes (the first bakery to introduce the "snow skin" mooncake in 1989), Hong Kong  
 
Happy Mid-Autumn Festival !!

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation; Somewhat common in Hong Kong

Tuesday, 17 September 2013

1260 HKSAR Name of the Day

Judianna Barnes Wai-ling, appeal judge, Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation; Substitution

Sunday, 15 September 2013

1259 HKSAR Name of the Day

Zandra Mok Yee-tuen, researcher, Hong Kong Policy Research Institute, Hong Kong
see 0269 HKSAR Name of the Day

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Friday, 13 September 2013

1258 HKSAR Name of the Day

Zeco Wan, coach, 26 Coaching (elite triathlon training and youth development), Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation

Wednesday, 11 September 2013

1257 HKSAR Name of the Day

Fenella Ng, executive committee member, Hong Kong Triathlon Association

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Monday, 9 September 2013

1256 HKSAR Name of the Day

Sunny Luk Kim-ching, movie director, Hong Kong

see 0147, 0572, 0703, 0931, 1109, 1146 HKSAR Names of the Day


About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare; somewhat common in Hong Kong

Saturday, 7 September 2013

1255 HKSAR Name of the Day

Longman Leung Lok-man, movie director, Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation; Phonetic-based

Thursday, 5 September 2013

1254 HKSAR Name of the Day

Dante Lam Chiu-yin, movie director, Hong Kong [e.g. The Beast Stalker (2008), The Stool Pigeon (2010)]

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Tuesday, 3 September 2013

1253 HKSAR Name of the Day

Elvis Luk Wai-ki, researcher, Hong Kong Ideas Centre

see 0164, 0707, 0890 and 1186 HKSAR Names of the Day.

Also, It's Official: Hong Kong Sevens Equals Sex And Drugs And Rock And Roll


About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare; Self-important; somewhat common in Hong Kong

Sunday, 1 September 2013

1252 HKSAR Name of the Day

Charlize Liu, public affairs manager, New World First Bus Services Limited, Citybus Limited, Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Friday, 30 August 2013

1251 HKSAR Name of the Day

Alpais Lam Wai-sze (Mrs), teacher, Pui Ling School of the Precious Blood, Fanling, Hong Kong (she gained infamy after losing her temper and shouting abuse (e.g. "What's the F#@k") at police handling a dispute in the pedestrian-only zone in Mong Kok in July 2013)


Background blurb from SCMP: Alpais Lam Wai-sze, a teacher at Pui Ling School of the Precious Blood in Fanling, sparked a protest in Mong Kok on August 4, 2013, after a viral video from July 14 showed her shouting profanity at police officers. In the clip, Lam was seen openly criticising the way the police were handling a confrontation between the Falun Gong and the Youth Care Association. Lam has taught for 18 years and won the Chief Executive's Award for Teaching Excellence in the 2010/2011 academic year.

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation

Wednesday, 28 August 2013

1250 HKSAR Name of the Day

Jeffie Lam, reporter, SCMP, Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Monday, 26 August 2013

1249 HKSAR Name of the Day

Silver Cheung Sai-wang, art director, Bruce Lee exhibition (started on 20 July 2013, the 40th Anniversary of Lee's death), Hong Kong Heritage Museum, Sha Tin, Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare for Males; Rare for Females

Saturday, 24 August 2013

1248 HKSAR Name of the Day

Drafus Chow, musician? music producer? Hong Kong

Pic courtesy SCMP

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Thursday, 22 August 2013

1247 HKSAR Name of the Day

Jase Tsoi (Mr), nutritionist, Catalo (a company producing Catalo New Zealand Active UMF 10+ Manuka Honey products at HK$378 (US$50) a 250g jar), Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Tuesday, 20 August 2013

1246 HKSAR Name of the Day

Gilly Wong Fung-han, chief executive, Consumer Council, Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation; Insertion

Monday, 19 August 2013

Jimmy's Kitchen Since 1928

Didn't I read this article before in 2009....and 2006....and 2001....and 1999....and 1994....and.....1991.....and....?

A witty comment about the "time warp" restaurant known as Jimmy's Kitchen by PCC Aug 15th 2013

The Dining Room of Jimmy's Kitchen Was Renovated In 2006. Pic Paul Yeung






Related Posts

So That's What She Looks Like

Critic of Food Critics

A Body Like A Fish

Verbal Diarrhoea #




Reference

Past forward: Colonial comfort classics at Jimmy's Kitchen (SCMP; paywall)

Jimmy's Kitchen has lost none of its old-world charm, writes Janice Leung Hayes

August 2013

When it opened in 1924 in Shanghai, the restaurant we now know as Jimmy's Kitchen was named The Broadway Lunch. But it didn't take long for regulars to start calling it "Jimmy's", after its founder Jimmy James, a former US navy officer.

Four years after its hugely successful debut in Shanghai, Jimmy found a partner, Aaron Landau, to open a branch in Hong Kong. Although it was shut during the Japanese occupation from 1941-45, Jimmy's Kitchen in Hong Kong has survived for longer than the original, and is one of the oldest restaurants in the city. James closed the Shanghai flagship in 1948 (it was revived in 2010), but the Landaus kept the flag flying here.

The restaurant opened close to Hong Kong's ports, on Lockhart Road in Wan Chai, mostly serving sailors. In 1934, it moved to Theatre Lane in Central - this time with Aaron Landau's son, Leo, taking charge. It moved again in 1975, to Wyndham Street, where it remains.

The operation also expanded to Tsim Sha Tsui, with a branch on Hankow Road opening in 1969.

Its clientele were British and American navy and military officers, and later, as the military presence declined, expatriates.

Martin Ho Kwok-leung, began working at the TST branch, but is now the captain of Jimmy's Kitchen in Central. Ho started at a time when long lunches were the norm. "Our clients were mostly expats. They had wine with their lunch, then something stronger with their cheese at the end of a meal. They'd still be here at 4pm."

Nowadays, the lunch crowd has cleared out by 2pm, but Jimmy's old-world charm remains intact. "We renovated in 2006, but the decor has been preserved. For instance, the bar is still at the front," Ho says, gesturing to the wrought iron divider that separates the bar from the entrance.

The Western comfort food menu is largely unchanged, Ho says. "Many young diners don't know what some of the dishes are," he says. "I have to explain them."

Ho, 71, says the only thing that keeps him from retiring is his customers: "Some have been coming here for four generations. Others who have left Hong Kong call me as soon as they come back. It's truly heartwarming to see them."

48hours@scmp.com



Jimmy's Kitchen, South China Building, 1-3 Wyndham Street, Central. Tel: 2526 5293; Kowloon Centre, 29 Ashley Road, Tsim Sha Tsui. Tel: 2376 0327. Open: Central, noon-3pm, 6pm-11pm; Kowloon, noon-2.30pm, 6pm-11pm







Sunday, 18 August 2013

1245 HKSAR Name of the Day

Milton Leong Ka-hong (Dr), obstetrics and gynaecology specialist who runs an infertility treatment centre and delivered Hong Kong's first test tube baby in 1986, Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Friday, 16 August 2013

1244 HKSAR Name fo the Day

Jet Li, mainland China martial artist and movie star

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Wednesday, 14 August 2013

1243 HKSAR Name of the Day

Jaycee Chan Jo-ming, son of Jackie Chan (Who chose this name? It represents "JC", so did Jackie Chan have anything to do with the naming of his son?)
 
It is of American origin, and is also used as a girl's name

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Monday, 12 August 2013

1242 HKSAR Name of the Day

Aggie Poon Pak-yan (Miss), Hong Kong athlete (100 metres, 100-metres hurdles and heptathlon) and Rugby player

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Saturday, 10 August 2013

1241 HKSAR Name of the Day

Johnson Lam Man-hon, High Court Judge, Hong Kong (great name for a judge; very respectable, no?) 
 

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare; Son-suffix; Somewhat common in Hong Kong

Thursday, 8 August 2013

1240 HKSAR Name of the Day

Frankie Yiu Fun-che, district court judge, Hong Kong (great name for a judge; very respectable, no?)

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Common; Phonetic-based?

Tuesday, 6 August 2013

1239 HKSAR Name of the Day

Fever Chu, cartoonist, Hong Kong (featured on Dolce Vita, TVB Pearl 26 November 2009)

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation

Sunday, 4 August 2013

1238 HKSAR Name of the Day

Thor Chan, game developer, Hong Kong (featured on Inside Story, ATV World 24 November 2009)

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Literature-based; Self-important

Friday, 2 August 2013

1237 HKSAR Name of the Day

Bobo Yip Po-lam, spokeswoman for an alliance of concern groups against the proposed National Education Policy (9 September 2012)
 

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation; somewhat common in Hong Kong

Thursday, 1 August 2013

Fung Shui Conman Tony Chan Gets His Just Desserts



 Nice hair Tony … er, Peter ...

Fung Shui "master" Tony Chan, who changed his English name to Peter Chan following his "enlightenment" with Jesus, was sentenced to twelve years on Independence Day (oh, what irony!) for forging the will of Nina Wang Kung Yu-sum, the late chairwoman of Chinachem and Asia's richest woman.

Take a look at the last line of the story (below), where journalist Patsy Moy's playful pun using "real heir" got left in. Sweet!

Has anyone ever noticed that dodgy hairdos appear to be a common theme amongst conmen …?

Speaking of which, take a look at this excellent music video along the same lines as evangelical con artists. It speaks volumes.

Genesis - Jesus He Knows Me (1991)




Related Posts

Tony Chan posts

Morality and Religion

Christians Being Silly posts


Jeremy Linsanity Lin Seriously Kooky




Reference

NINA WANG SAGA
Peter Chan Chun-chuen, who used to go by Tony Chan, is a Hong Kong-born businessman and former fung shui practitioner born in December 1959. In 2013, Chan went on trial accused of forging the will of Nina Wang Kung Yu-sum, the late chairwoman of Chinachem and Asia's richest woman. Chan denied the charges, but was found guilty in the Court of First Instance on July 4, 2013.





Conman Peter Chan 'joyful' in prison after 'Holy Spirit spoke to him' (SCMP; paywall)

Will forger who has just started 12-year stretch said to be 'joyful' in his lucky cell No 7 and is happy with what God has in store for him
Friday, 19 July, 2013, 10:28am

Patsy Moy patsy.moy@scmp.com

Prophecies, mystical numbers and holy voices have left jailed feng shui conman Peter Chan Chun-chuen "joyful" after his first two weeks behind bars - and he has already started writing a book, according to one of his visitors.

Chan, who recently renounced geomancy for Christianity, was not desperate to get out; rather the man jailed for 12 years for forging the will of the late billionaire Nina Wang Kung Yu-sum believes his fate is in God's hands. But he has filed an appeal.
Peter said he was completely satisfied with what God has arranged … and he has no immediate desire to leave Stanley

The friend who went to see him in Stanley Prison spoke to the South China Morning Post on condition of anonymity. "Peter said he was completely satisfied with what God has arranged … and he has no immediate desire to leave Stanley," his visitor said.

The friend described Chan, 53, as "joyful" after meeting many Christians in the prison who had prayed for him and comforted him, and he had not been ill-treated by other inmates. This is contrary to earlier reports that Chan was depressed and feared violence from other inmates.

According to the friend, Chan said he had been told in February by a prophet from India that God would prepare something "unusual" for him in July. Chan was sentenced to 12 years in jail on July 5 for forging a will he claimed was Wang's.

The friend described how the prophet was said to have stressed the importance of the number seven.

"Chan said that when he arrived at his cell, it was July 7 and 7pm. And the cell number? Seven.

"He told me that when he first stepped into the cell it was very dark and the light was not on. But inside it seemed very bright and a voice told him the No 7 cell would be his study to equip and prepare himself. "Peter told me he was very touched at that moment," the friend said.

Yesterday, the Correctional Services Department refused to disclose the number of Chan's cell, nor is it known on what day he was assigned to it.

Chan had another religious experience on his way to the prison, according to the friend.

"Peter recalled that when he was inside the prison van, the Holy Spirit had spoken to him to remind him to keep peace of mind," he said.

"The Holy Spirit told him that nothing was beyond his ability to shoulder and God had arranged a guiding angel to walk the path with him."

With leave to appeal yet to be granted, Chan told his friend he had started writing a book and planned to spend his time in prison studying theology, philosophy and English.

Chan, who picked up fung shui from a book, was once worth HK$2.7 billion after becoming Wang's fung shui guru and, the court heard, her lover.

Chan said Wang regularly gave him cash payments of between HK$300,000 and HK$1 million, boosted considerably by three mammoth payments of HK$688 million each.

Now he earns HK$70 a month gluing envelopes. His friend said he would get his first wage in the middle of next month and planned to spend the money on stamps so he could write to people, including his friends from the church.

The forged will made Chan - who was known as Tony before he became a Christian - sole beneficiary of Wang's HK$83 billion estate. But in a drawn-out legal case, Wang's Chinachem Charitable Foundation was ruled the real heir.






Wednesday, 31 July 2013

1236 HKSAR Name of the Day

Kenty Chan, 50, protester against the proposed National Education Policy (9 September 2012)

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation; Insertion for males

Monday, 29 July 2013

1235 HKSAR Name of the Day

Jannie Tam (Ms), Dymocks Bookstore Franchise, Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Saturday, 27 July 2013

1234 HKSAR Name of the Day

Darvis Pun, advertising department, squarefoot.com.hk, Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation; Insertion; Substitution 

Thursday, 25 July 2013

1233 HKSAR Name of the Day

Cato Sze, art department, squarefoot.com.hk, Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Tuesday, 23 July 2013

1232 HKSAR Name of the Day

Vienna Lee, marketing department, squarefoot.com.hk, Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare; Geography-based

Sunday, 21 July 2013

1231 HKSAR Name of the Day

Solina Chau, director, Li Ka Shing Foundation, Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation; Substitution

Friday, 19 July 2013

1230 HKSAR Name of the Day

Congo Sin (Mr), florist, voted for pan-democrats in NT East, Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation; Geography-based?

Wednesday, 17 July 2013

1229 HKSAR Name of the Day

Daneil Lam Shui-ming (Mr), chairman, Universe International, Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation; Translocation

Monday, 15 July 2013

1228 HKSAR Name of the Day

Melody Kuen-Kuen Chuang, flautist and student, Hong Kong Academy of Performing Arts (performed with Ian Anderson in Plays the Best of Jethro Tull, June 2013)

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare; Job-based

Saturday, 13 July 2013

1227 HKSAR Name of the Day

Evangeline Tsang, photographer, South China Morning Post, Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Thursday, 11 July 2013

1226 HKSAR Name of the Day

Luby Chow, reporter, The Standard (Sing Tao Group), Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation; Substitution 

Tuesday, 9 July 2013

1225 HKSAR Name of the Day

Moses Ng, graphic designer, Flash On Weekly magazine, Hong Kong
 
See other Moses names such as supposedly  0112, 0591, 0489 and 1140 HKSAR Names of the Day 


About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare; Literature-based; Self-important; somewhat common in Hong Kong

Sunday, 7 July 2013

1224 HKSAR Name of the Day

Annis Fung Lai-chu (Ms), assistant professor, Department of Applied Social Sciences, City University, Hong Kong


About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Friday, 5 July 2013

1223 HKSAR Name of the Day

Calamity Chang, actress, Shame

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation

Wednesday, 3 July 2013

1222 HKSAR Name of the Day

Cherry Tse Ling Kit-ching, permanent secretary, Education Bureau, Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Monday, 1 July 2013

1221 HKSAR Name of the Day

Gidget Lun Kit-chi, architect, Hong Kong 
(in a newspaper feature about changing Chinese New Year Traditions Gidget said: "[My] parents are very liberal. My mum never pressed me to do anything for the new year.")

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation; Phonetic-based?

Sunday, 30 June 2013

Tennis Health and Fitness Views

On show at Wimbledon this year is 19-year-old Laura Robson and 42-year-old Kimiko Date-Krumm and their relative states of "healthiness".

 Laura Robson (above) and Kimiko Date-Krumm

 Photos from here and here

 Laura Robson, 19,  still has some chubbiness

Most of us have heard of "puppy fat" but in general body fat composition can be controlled relatively early in life. For example, there are many sports events where young sportspersons at the start of their professional careers have already attained, more or less, their ideal body fat and protein ratios (e.g. football players, track athletes, cyclists, to name a few).

Young tennis players in general do not fall into this category.  They seem to get healthier and less chubbier with time—this apparently after they "discover" the correct training regime that truly gives them their optimal fitness that in turn allows them to produce optimal performances consistently on the tennis court. Andy Murray is an example of someone who belated optimized his fitness levels. Andre Agassi is another and Serena Williams' muscle definition has certainly matured along with her career.

If Laura Robson is to become a Top Ten female tennis player (she's just this minute reached the last 16 of Wimbledon) and fulfill her Grand Slam potential, it is clear her health and fitness levels will need to improve.

Taking a look at the British tennis players who did not progress beyond Wimbledon's first round (e.g. James Ward, Tara Moore, Johanna Konta, Elena Baltacha, Anne Keothavong, Kyle Edmund and Samantha Murray), I would hazard an educated guess that their fitness are not optimal. For instance, Elena Baltacha has always been chubby and has not made much progress in her years as a journeywoman tennis pro. This is a fate that Laura Robson should avoid. 




Related Posts

Wimbledon Wow Factor

Healthy And Fit From My Perspective

Andy Murray Gaining Physical Power, Stamina and Overall Fitness







Saturday, 29 June 2013

1220 HKSAR Name of the Day

Maisy Lo, convener of the press freedom committee for the Hong Kong Journalists Association

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Thursday, 27 June 2013

1219 HKSAR Name of the Day

Serenade Woo Lai-wan, Asia-Pacific project manager, International Federation of Journalists, Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation

Tuesday, 25 June 2013

1218 HKSAR Name of the Day

Rico Chan, coach of the Hong Kong Arsenal Soccer School (former AO or government Administrative Officer), Hong Kong
 
see 0637, 0941 and 0971 HKSAR Names of the Day

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare; Somewhat common in Hong Kong

Sunday, 23 June 2013

1217 HKSAR Name of the Day

Elim Wong, operations manager, Star Ferry, Hong Kong 

Note: Elim is "Mile" spelled backward?

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation

Friday, 21 June 2013

1216 HKSAR Name of the Day

Dorian Ho, local celebrity, Hong Kong 
Jim Tsim, Fala Chen, May Law and Dorian Ho

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare; Literature-based; Self-important

Wednesday, 19 June 2013

Little Boys Dressed As Girls

"seems he likes little boys also … that is a little boy dressed like a girl, isnt it?"



Ji Yingnan, 25, with Fan Yue, an official with whom she had an affair


The above comment is from an SCMP reader (aplucky1) in response to the news story (reference below) about a middle-aged middle-ranking Chinese Communist Party official and his affair with a 25-year-old TV reporter.

I have come across similar comments which are usually attributed to women—usually western women—who criticize men—usually western men—for choosing Chinese or Asian girlfriends or wives. There are of course variations to this "western perspective" (or "yellow fever") theme … such as corrupt middle-aged men of any race who woo (or "prey" on) younger women who, apparently, are fresh out of college.

Discussion points?

1) Are the body types of some Chinese or Asian women similar to the body type of prepubescent males?

2) Are there hidden homosexual tendencies in men (western or otherwise) who have a preference for Chinese or Asian women who have similar body types to that of prepubescent males?

3) Are western women envious of Chinese or Asian women in terms of body type? And/or are they critical of men who prefer Asian women over western women?

4) Is equality and mutual respect so hard to achieve in a relationship? This was discussed in previous posts Is It A Hard Life? and Understanding Unfaithfulness.

5) Are younger women necessarily "innocent victims" in the fallout?

6) Are older men always to be castigated for commenting positively on younger women? Examples here from a 58-year-old Hong Kong dentist and a 71-year-old British novelist.


Reference

Party accused of covering up official's lavish lifestyle (SCMP; paywall)
Tuesday, 18 June, 2013, 4:26am

Laura Zhou laura.zhou@scmp.com

A young television anchor who exposed a philandering State Archives Administration official, has accused the Communist Party's General Office, where the man previously worked, of trying to cover up the scandal.

Ji Yingnan, a 25-year-old anchorwoman on the China Travel & Economic Channel, said yesterday the State Archives had passed on a message from the General Office asking her to "seek formal channels" to solve the case, instead of "expanding [negative] influence".

Ji said that exposing her affair with Fan Yue, a deputy director-general of the State Archives' policy and legal affairs office, had been her last option. "It forced me to leap out through the window and try the side door."

She posted details of the affair on her verified Sina Weibo microblog on Friday, saying Fan gave her 10,000 yuan (HK$12,500) daily, and bought her an Audi worth 700,000 yuan in late 2009 and a white Porsche worth more than 1.3 million yuan last summer. The posts were soon removed and she has been banned from microblogging - on Sina and Tencent - since Friday.

Ji said she tried "formal channels", for example, reporting the case to the party committee of the State Archives Administration, the secretariat bureau of the party's General Office and the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection in the past few months, but had been either blocked by security guards or had her reports ignored.

The Friday post sparked questions on how a mid-level official could fund such a lavish lifestyle.

Ji said that when they met in 2009, Fan told her that he managed an information technology firm in Beijing. She later discovered that he was a civil servant, but was told that he worked in a department that dealt with confidential affairs and was not allowed to tell her more.

State Archives Administration spokesman Guo Siping, who is also Fan's supervisor, told Xinhua that Fan had resigned, but "what the female whistle-blower described was not completely true, even though Fan did have problems", Zhongguowangshi, a Xinhua microblog reported yesterday. The post was later deleted and related report removed from the Xinhuanet.com news portal.

Calls to the State Archives went unanswered yesterday.



Some Comments posted on SCMP:

newgalileo Jun 18th 2013
11:25am
Being pretty familiar with those cases in Beijing, not a surprise. Sugar daddies are all around, explaining why pretty young girls drive around in expensive cars. Both are to be blamed. Come on, 10,000 RMB per day? If per month, would seem a bit more reasonable but Chinese men are at the top to spend money like crazy on those girls. Where is this money coming from? Oh I see, this is why the postings are being removed by the censors. The system is rotten to the core. Cover it up quickly. Not much pity for the girl either, a real bloodsucker as there are so many around here. Who knows she is telling the truth? Fortunately not all Chinese girls are like that.

crbfile Jun 18th 2013
9:36am
that is a nightmare female. in common parlance a B-I-Y-A-T-C-H

aplucky1 Jun 18th 2013
8:00am
seems he likes little boys also
that is a little boy dressed like a girl, isnt it?


syracuse37 Jun 18th 2013
7:56am
I usually would rant about the corruption. However recently many of those minor wife or girlfriend try to destroy the life of officers in China. I have to admit I have absolutely no respect for someone who willfully benefited from all this money and then turns around and tries to look like they do it for the right reason. **** if he is guilty of corruption, then she should also be guilty of living on the result of corruption.






1215 HKSAR Name of the Day

Jim Tsim Sui-man, local comedian, Hong Kong



About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Common but sounds odd in combination with surname

Monday, 17 June 2013

1214 HKSAR Name of the Day

Ankie Beilke, local model and daughter of former actress Ankie Lau Heung-ping, Hong Kong
Keeping it in the family ... Ankie
About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation; Insertion

Saturday, 15 June 2013

1213 HKSAR Name of the Day

Ankie Lau Heung-ping, Hong Kong actress (1970s and 80s) and mother of local model Ankie Beilke, Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Creation; Insertion

Thursday, 13 June 2013

Do Not Think I Won't Kill You Dwarf


Listen carefully to what Legolas says here. Pic courtesy Warner Bros.


On Middle Earth, is Legolas and the rest of the elves being consistent in their use of word contractions? It does not seem so.

As a comparison, in the Star Trek universe Mr Spock and Data are extremely careful to avoid word contractions.




Related Posts

Tsing Tao Beer Spans the Galaxy

0871 HKSAR Name of the Day


Reference

New Trailer of The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug




1212 HKSAR Name of the Day

Ambrose Ho Pui-him, vice chairman, Consumer Council, Hong Kong

About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Tuesday, 11 June 2013

Wanted: Missing Chinese Man with yellow complexion and short black hair

Hong Kong's finest have asked the public to help find the whereabouts of a 23-year-old mainlander who got separated from his parents.

“He has a long face, yellow complexion and short black hair,” police said in a statement. He was last seen wearing a black T-shirt, black trousers and black sports shoes.

Well, at least that rules out all the non-Chinese males here, who make up approximately 1% of all men in Hong Kong.


Reference

Public asked for help in finding missing tourist (SCMP; paywall)
Monday, 10 June, 2013 [Updated: 4:57PM]

Clifford Lo clifford.lo@scmp.com

Police are making a public appeal for help in tracing a 23-year-old mainland tourist who went missing in Hong Kong last Friday.

Huang Dongze left  L’hotel in Yeung Uk Road, Tsuen Wan, last Friday at about 4:30pm with his parents but got separated from them, polce said on Monday morning.

Hours later, his family sought police help in finding him.

Huang, who came to Hong Kong on June 4 for a sightseeing trip, is about 1.78 metres tall, has a medium build and weighs 65 kilograms.

“He has a long face, yellow complexion and short black hair,” police said in a statement. He was last seen wearing a black T-shirt, black trousers and black sports shoes.

Anyone with information as to his whereabouts should contact the regional missing persons unit of New Territories South police at 3661 1171 or any police station.

In the case of another missing person, the body of a Hong Kong man, Ng Fei-chuen, 61, was found at a hillside near Nga Choy Hang Tsuen off Cape D’Aguilar Road in Shek O at about 12.30pm on Monday.

Police said their initial investigation found nothing suspicious.

Ng went missing after he left his home in North Point on Saturday.




1211 HKSAR Name of the Day

Alfie Lam, 48-year-old kidney transplant survivor, Hong Kong 
 
the meaning of Alfie is "elf or magical counsel; ready for battle"


About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Sunday, 9 June 2013

1210 HKSAR Name of the Day

Warton Li, photographer, SCMP, Hong Kong
 
About Novel HKSAR Names
Name Category: Rare

Saturday, 8 June 2013

Hamburger and Coke: A Champion's Diet

"I still can have a hamburger in my hand and a Coke in my hand and eat on the street and nobody would recognise me."
confesses plump female Chinese golfer Feng Shanshan

Fatty golfer Feng Shanshan is a champion


Reference

China trailblazer Feng returns to defend major title (SCMP; paywall)
Thursday, 06 June, 2013, 4:16pm

Reuters



Shanshan Feng, of China. Photo: AP

Feng Shanshan won accolades when she returned home after becoming China’s first winner on the LPGA Tour, and now she returns to Locust Hill to defend her LPGA Championship, the second major of the season.

The 23-year-old Feng, coming off a runner-up finish in last week’s ShopRite LPGA Classic in New Jersey, will be trying to extend a streak of eight consecutive LPGA majors won by Asian players in the tournament beginning on Thursday.

Her LPGA Championship triumph in Pittsford, New York, thrust Feng into the spotlight.

She held a news conference at the airport upon her return to China, another one in Beijing and another in her hometown of Guangzhou and topping her list of “coolest things about being a major champion” came at a special awards ceremony in January.

“I was named best non-Olympic athlete in China,” Feng said ahead of Thursday’s opening round.

“I was sitting with so many of the Olympic players in China and I was the first golfer to be nominated. I think the government is paying more attention to golf.”

Feng had seven other top-10 finishes last year. This year, she has posted four top-10s from eight events and feels a switch to different clubs helped her to the runner-up finish last weekend and boosted her confidence.

“My iron shots were really accurate and my short game was pretty good. So I would say the clubs helped a lot,” the world number seven said.

Competition in the 144-player field will be keen, including a trio of South Korean winners of the last three major titles.

World number one Inbee Park, winner of this season’s opening grand slam, the Kraft Nabisco Championship, reigning US Women’s Open champion Choi Na-yeon, and British Women’s Open winner Jiyai Shin are eager to add more hardware on the testing Locust Hill layout.

“I don’t know whether I’m getting old, [but] the course is tougher,” said 24-year-old Park. “It’s a very tough golf course, very good, challenging. The rough is really up and the greens are really firmer than the years I’ve played before.”

American Stacy Lewis, winner of the 2011 Kraft Nabisco and the last non-Asian to win a major, is confident she can return to the winner’s circle.

“I feel like I’ve had chances, and I’ve been in contention, so it doesn’t weigh on me that much,” said world number two Lewis, who has won six times on tour since winning the Kraft.

“I feel like my game is made for majors and it’s only a matter of time.”

Australian Karrie Webb, who held off Feng to win last week’s LPGA event, showed she was still a threat to add to her major championships haul of seven.

“I guess I don’t look at the age thing,” said Webb. “I know what I’m capable of and I know that’s good enough to win out here.”

Feng showed she could win by charging back from three-shots out to win in her last visit Locust Hill, firing a final-round 67 for a two-stroke victory.

Despite the newfound attention, Feng said she has a way to go to match the popularity of Yani Tseng and Ai Miyazato in their home countries.

“Yani’s like a rock star in Taiwan. It’s like Ai Miyazato in Japan,” said Feng. “Me, in China, well, I still can have a hamburger in my hand and a Coke in my hand and eat on the street and nobody would recognise me.

“But of course, after we play better and better, of course more and more people will recognise us.”